International Students

Sharing your immigration status.

Below are questions we often hear from international students who want to work in the U.S. after graduation.

  • Can employers limit their interviewing and hiring to U.S. citizens?
    Sometimes, if citizenship is deemed to be an essential part of the position. The National Association of Colleges and Employers has some helpful information on this topic.
  • Should I list my immigration status on my resume?
    You do not need to list your immigration status on your resume. Your educational background and work history will display that you are an international student. You should never lie about your immigration status, but are not required to disclose it on your resume.
  • When in the hiring process do I reveal that I’m an international student?
    Some employers adhere to strict policies against hiring foreign nationals. Others may prefer to hire U.S. citizens, but can be convinced otherwise. It is usually recommended that students wait until an employer asks, but be aware of whether the company has petitioned for visas in the past. If you are being asked to travel for an interview, it would be wise to ask, “Is this a position in which the company is willing to petition for an H1-B as I am currently in F-1 status?”
  • Are there questions that are illegal for an employer to ask me?

    An employer MAY NOT ask: “What is your visa type, nationality, place of birth?” or “Of which country are you a citizen?” or “What is your native language?” or “What language do you most often speak?”

    An employer MAY ask: “Are you legally authorized to work in the United States?” or “Will you now or in the future require sponsorship for an employment visa?” or “Which languages do you read, speak or write?” (provided that foreign language skills are job related)

  • I am in F-1 status. What should I say when an employer asks about my work authorization?
    Explain that you have the legal right to work in the U.S. for up to twelve months using Optional Practical Training (OPT) following graduation. The employer does not need to do anything in order for this to happen. If you have graduated with a degree in one of the STEM (Sciences, Tech, Engineering, and Math) fields, then share that you are eligible for a 24-month STEM extension of your OPT. If you do not have a degree in a STEM field or if you’ve completed your STEM extension, you should explain that your work authorization may be authorized for another three-to-six years with H-1B status. If the employer asks for more information, you should be able to clearly explain the H-1B process. To learn more, OGS hosts an H-1B session each semester. Helpful hint: Avoid using the word “sponsor,” instead use the word “petition” when speaking about H-1B status

 

How to Tell If a Company Truly Values Diversity and Inclusion (or Is Just All Talk)

Employers talk a lot about diversity and inclusion. In fact, you’ll be hard-pressed to find a company that doesn’t say they’re diverse and inclusive. Companies make these claims on their web sites, in job descriptions, and at career fairs. But how …

By Victorio Duran III - Vault
Vault
A comprehensive resource for students and job seekers looking for career advice, job postings, company reviews from employees, and rankings of the best companies and industry employers.
Read more »

6 Options for International Students Who Didn’t Win the H-1B Lottery

Another H-1B lottery season has come to an end. This year, the number of applications far exceeded the 85,000 allotted H-1Bs, the visas international students typically need to work in the U.S. after graduation. This means that, yet again, numerous …

By Derek Loosvelt - Vault
Vault
A comprehensive resource for students and job seekers looking for career advice, job postings, company reviews from employees, and rankings of the best companies and industry employers.
Read more »

Featured Resources